COVID Information: Review our current visitor policies or visit the COVID-19 Resource Center. *For everyone’s safety, masks are required at all times in our facilities. Thank you.

Covid-19 Vaccine Information

As of March 5, 2021, Platte Valley Medical Clinic, a division of Kearney Regional Medical Center, will no longer be receiving allocations of COVID-19 vaccine from the Two Rivers Public Health Department (TRPHD). Instead, TRPHD will be taking over administration of the vaccine and setting up public vaccine clinics.

Click here to learn more.

If you are unable to access the online form or need assistance, please call TRPHD at 888-669-7154.

Vaccinated-sticker

Due to a limited supply, health officials are being asked to vaccinate people in phases. As supply increases, more people will be able to receive the vaccine. Below is the projected timeline of vaccine estimated by DHHS.

Vaccine-Timeline

Currently, there are three main types of COVID-19 vaccines on the market. Below is a description of how each type of vaccine prompts our bodies to recognize and protect us from the virus that causes COVID-19. None of these vaccines can give you COVID-19.

  • mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 that gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.
  • Protein subunit vaccines include harmless pieces (proteins) of the virus that cause COVID-19 instead of the entire germ. Once vaccinated, our immune system recognizes that the proteins don’t belong in the body and begins making T-lymphocytes and antibodies. If we are ever infected in the future, memory cells will recognize and fight the virus.
  • Vector vaccines contain a weakened version of a live virus—a different virus than the one that causes COVID-19—that has genetic material from the virus that causes COVID-19 inserted in it (this is called a viral vector). Once the viral vector is inside our cells, the genetic material gives cells instructions to make a protein that is unique to the virus that causes COVID-19. Using these instructions, our cells make copies of the protein. This prompts our bodies to build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight that virus if we are infected in the future.

(Source: CDC)

The FDA determines if a vaccine meets its safety and effectiveness standards, then will make vaccines available for use in the United States by approval of emergency use authorization (EUA). While vaccines are being developed as quickly as possible, routine processes and procedures remain in place to ensure the safety of any vaccine that is authorized or approved for use.

(Source: CDC)

Final analysis of Large Phase 3 trials for the first two vaccines approved for FDA EUA are reporting a 94% and 95% efficacy.  Reports also indicate that vaccinated subjects that did become ill with COVID-19 did not develop severe illness.

Most people do not have serious problems after being vaccinated. However, your arm may be sore, red, or warm to the touch. Some people report getting a headache or fever when getting a vaccine. This is normal and a sign that your immune system is learning how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about the facts behind COVID-19 vaccines.

Both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are mRNA vaccines and do not contain live or attenuated (weakened) virus.

mRNA vaccines contain material from the virus that causes COVID-19 to gives our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. After our cells make copies of the protein, they destroy the genetic material from the vaccine. Our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build antibodies (T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes) that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.

mRNA vaccines have not been used to immunize humans previously, but the science has been studied for years. This CDC link explains the process in more detail.

mRNA from the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines never enters the nucleus of the cell and does not affect or interact with a person’s DNA.

The Moderna and Pfizer vaccine both require two doses. The first shot starts building protection. A second shot a few weeks later is needed to get the most protection the vaccine has to offer. Timing of the second dose is dependent on vaccine manufacturer.

Most likely, early evidence suggests natural immunity from COVID-19 may not last very long, especially in persons that were asymptomatic or with mild illness. Until the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices makes recommendations on how to best use COVID-19 vaccines, CDC has not commented on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine.

People  who are pregnant and part of a group recommended to receive the COVID-19 vaccine may choose to be vaccinated. If you have questions about getting vaccinated, talking with a healthcare provider may might help you make an informed decision. While breastfeeding is an important consideration, it is rarely a safety concern with vaccines.

No data are available yet on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women or on the effects of mRNA vaccines on breastfed infants or on milk production/excretion. mRNA vaccines are not thought to be a risk to breastfeeding infants. People who are breastfeeding and are part of a group recommended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, such as healthcare personnel, may choose to be vaccinated.

To make sure that more information is gathered regarding the safety of these vaccines when administered during pregnancy, pregnant people are encouraged to enroll in v-safe, CDC’s new smartphone-based tool being used to check-in on people’s health after they receive a COVID-19 vaccine. If pregnant people report health events through v-safe after vaccination, someone from CDC may call to check on them and get more information. Additionally, pregnant people enrolled in v-safe will be contacted by CDC and asked to participate in a pregnancy registry that will monitor them through pregnancy and the first 3 months of infancy. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccination considerations for people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

There is not enough information currently available to say if or when CDC will stop recommending that people wear masks and avoid close contact with others to help prevent the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before making that decision. Other factors, including how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in communities, will also affect this decision.

Video Resources

This is a video recording of Dr. Brent Crandal, Emergency Medicine Physician, explaining the MRNA vaccine options to staff at KRMC.